Poster

Intersectionality, Art & Activism Panel Discussion | Tuesday 28th March, 6 – 8 pm

Intersectionality, Art & Activism Panel Discussion
Tuesday 28th March, 6 – 8 pm
Klapper Gallery, Klapper Hall 4th Fl
Queens College CUNY

Special guests: 
 . Daisy Bulgarin (Semillas Collective Co-founder)
 . Fernanda Espinosa (People´s Collective Arts Member)
 . Amin Husain (G.U.L.F., MTL, NYC Solidarity with
   Palestina Co-founder and Gulf Labor Coalition Member)
 . Kerbie Joseph (ANSWER Coalition and Party for
   Socialism & Liberation Organizer)
 . Zelene Pineda Suchilt (Political Organizer, Artist Activist & Storyteller)
 . Charlie Urichima (Kichwa Hatari Co-founder and NICE
   organizer)
 . Lino Wampusrik (NYC Shuar Organization President)
   Organized & Moderated by Alejandro Salgado Cendales (MFA ’17)
   Sponsored by Social Practice Queens (SPQ)
   with support by The Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation
RSVP on facebook:
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Beacon of Pluralism brings together faith communities across Flushing

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“There’s a kind of renewal that can happen for people spiritually or through community that can really sustain us in these times,” said Chloe Bass, a visiting professor at Queens College.” (NY1 Flushing)

The Beacon of Pluralism project joins together the diverse cultural, ethnic & religious communities of Flushing, Queens to remember the basic right of religious freedom that Flushing prides itself on. Located in the heart of Flushing, are two historic sites: The Bowne House, former home of John Bowne, a pioneer in the American struggle for religious liberty and the Quaker Meeting House a place of worship for Flushing’s early Dutch settlers. John Bowne and the community joined together to deliver the Flushing Remonstrance to Governor Stuyvesant on December 27, 1657, marking the beginning of religious freedom in America.

The project is led by Gina Minielli Gunkel, a professional social documentary photographer (SPQ class of 2016), and Nancy Bruno, a NYC public school teacher and ceramic sculpture artist (Queens College MFA class of 2017).

The first Beacon of Pluralism event took place in January 2017, just days after Trump’s proposed “Muslim ban.” The event was held at the Flushing Quaker Meeting House which is considered by historians to be the birthplace of religious freedom in the United States. This event was well-attended and received positive reactions form the community. The dialogue ceremony was covered by local news media outlets including NY1 (television), and print & digital editions of the Queens Chronicle (QNS.com) and US China Press.

Read & watch more about the January event:

http://www.ny1.com/nyc/queens/news/2017/01/31/flushing-religious-communities-comes-together-to-spread-hope.html

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‘Protecting Our Nature and Our Sacred Land at Oak Flat’ at the Peace Table | 01/29

Protecting Our Nature and Our Sacred Land at Oak Flat
A Social Practice Queens Discussion at the Peace Table

Jan 29 2017
3:30pm–5:00pm

You are invited to participate in a pertinent conversation on land, protection and culture, that surround the case of Oak Flat, sacred to San Carlos Apache in Arizona.

Oak Flat Campground is located outside of Superior, Arizona in a part of Tonto National Forest and has been protected since 1955 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. This area of land is sacred to the San Carlos Apache, and contains more than 2,400 acres of land, wildlife, petroglyphs, sacred spaces, water resources, and lying beneath the surface, a copper deposit thought to be the largest in the hemisphere. Through a controversial land-swap presented in an unrelated 2015 National Defense Bill by John McCain, this land-swap would allow Resolution Copper (a joint venture by Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton) to develop a block cave mine which as perceived would create a 2-mile wide crater.

Convening at Mierle Laderman Ukeles’ Peace Table, Social Practice Queens invites Mr. Wendlser Nosie Sr. (pictured above), former chairman of the San Carlos Apache Reservation, and Standing Fox, Apache Stronghold member, Bedonkohe Apache photographer and artist to lead a conversation about the current situation at Oak Flat including the repeal of the Defense Bill, the protection of sacred spaces, mining contamination in important riparian habitats, and the importance of environmental stewardship.

We are incredibly honored to have this conversation in Queens to support the San Carlos Apache tribe’s vision in “creating environments that ensure the greatest opportunity to succeed, and to become self-sufficient for Indigenous and all communities.”

This conversation will be accompanied by photography and video by Standing Fox, and current SPQ MFA candidates Floor Grootenhuis, and Erin Turner.

The event has been generously supported by Queens College CUNY, Queens Museum and the Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation.

Further Resources:

Apache Stronghold Website

Petition to save Oak Flat

 

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A Curator Talks Social Practice at Queens College

Located about an hour outside of the usual New York City art hubs, Queens College has long been renowned for its studio-based Social Practice MFA program with current and former professors including artist Chloë Bass, Vito Acconci, Maureen Connor, and Judith Bernstein.

After having been given the opportunity to curate an all-female show in the student gallery, I was stunned by the variety of available media at the facility, including a woodshop and a bronze-casting studio. Material Archive (April 2016) aims to present the viewer with diversity in materiality while also offering an investigation of the notion of the artwork as a vessel of personal, historical and cultural memory.

Read more on ArtReport.

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Queens Residents Remind Trump Where He Comes From

Sunday November 20th, an oversized mailbox was installed in Jackson Heights’ Diversity Plaza, an invitation to Queens residents to send postcards to President-elect Donald Trump. The action, called Letters from Homewas organized by the Center for Artistic Activism as the culmination of its Arts Action Academy at the Queens Museum with SPQ alumni Sol Aramendi and current MFA Alix Camacho.

“We realized something about Queens, that it’s one of the most ethnically diverse places on Earth and it’s the [childhood] home of Donald Trump,” Stephen Duncombe, co-director of the Center for Artistic Activism, told Hyperallergic. “Here’s this person who’s talking about making America ‘great again,’ but of course the America that he came from is one of the most diverse places on Earth.”

Watch the video here!

Read the full article on Hyperallergic!

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Launch event of the Jornaler@ App

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SPQ alumni Sol Aramendi invites you to the launch event of the Jornaler@ App this coming Monday. This long term project was possible by the collaboration of many people, organizations and agencies. Will be great to have you there.
Now, with the new administration fast approaching, workers across the country are wondering how they can defend themselves against the regressive labor policies to come. For jornaleros, attempts to devalue their labor have been constant. Every day they face the threat of going without pay, being paid less than the minimum wage, or being subjected to workplace dangers outside of their control. Fighting back has never been optional.

That’s why over two years ago day labor centers in New York started creating a new tool in the struggle to end worker exploitation.

We are launching Jornaler@ App with a press conference on Monday, November 21, from 11:00 am -12:00 PM.

Launch of Jornaler@ App
Press Conference
11:00am – 12:00am
69th Street and 37th Ave in Queens, NY

(3 blocks from the 69 street stop of the 7 train and 4 blocks from 74 Roosevelt E, R, M, F, 7)

Hosted by New Immigrant Community Empowerment (NICE), there will be a light breakfast, a brief walkthrough of Jornaler@ given by day laborers from NICE with artist Sol Aramendi that were closely involved with the design process, remarks by the Executive Director of NICE Manuel Castro, by Director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) Pablo Alvarado, President Kenneth Rigmaiden of the Painters Union, President Richard Trumka of the AFL-CIO and other invited guests.

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Workshop & Artist Talk: Ala Plastica — ‘Rivers As Quiet Dialogues’

Rivers as “Quiet Dialogues” and Other Environmental Perspectives of Ala Plástica
Open A.I.R. Artist Services Talk and Workshop

Oct 16 2016
2:00pm–5:00pm

—En Español abajo—

Ala Plástica is an art and environmental organization based in Río de la Plata, Argentina that works on the rhizomatic linking of ecological, social, and artistic methodology, combining direct interventions and precisely defined concepts to a parallel universe without giving up the symbolic potential of art. They are concerned with relating the artist’s way of thinking and working with the development of projects in the social and environmental realm. Since 1991 Ala Plástica has developed a range of non-conventional artworks, focused on local and regional problems, and in close contact and collaboration with other artists, scientists and environmental groups. Ala Plástica works bio-regionally, within Argentina, as well as internationally in relationship to other transformative arts practitioners.

The lecture by Alejandro Meitin, co-founder of the collective, explores a number of critical transdisciplinary initiatives carried out by Ala Plástica that in their very constitution and process of development integrate an artistic way of thinking and working related to art and the environment in the Rio de la Plata Basin and internationally. These initiatives comprise communicative strategies and actions connected to social contexts that sharply contrast with modernist ideologies of art’s neutrality. The initiatives not only operate amidst the art world’s discursive assumptions, institutional contexts, and publics but also engage with the discourses of both art and activism, opening up possibilities for aesthetics to transcend its disciplinary confines and operative orbits.

These references would help participants understand how artists can constructively engage with community-based economies involving craft work, subsistence farming, forestry and many other activities which today can benefit from specialized knowledge and innovative techniques. The lecture would seek to transmit a holistic approach to the challenges and struggles of a constantly changing world, in such a way that participants can recognize their own opportunities and responsibilities.

The lecture will conclude with a short field methods workshop in which participants will walk to the Flushing River and collect visual and sonic data on their phones which will be collaged together as a group project.

Free, RSVP required to preddy@queensmuseum.org

Please note this event will have simultaneous interpretation for Spanish and English speakers.

About Alejandro Meitin:

Artist, lawyer and founding member of the art collective Ala Plastica (1991 – Current) based in the city of La Plata, Argentina. Additionally, Alejandro Meitin has participated in the research, development and implementation of many collaborative art practices, working with residents, youth, farmers, artists, activists, architects, landscape architects, local authorities and pollution control experts. He has collaborated with regional, national and making proposals on international rivers and water resources systems and conducted exhibitions, teaching, residencies, publications, given lectures and conferences in Latin America, North America and Europe.

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Ala Plástica, es una organización artístico-ambiental que desarrolla su actividad principalmente en el área del Estuario del Río de la Plata (Argentina). Desde 1991, Ala Plástica ha llevado a cabo una serie de iniciativas artísticas no convencionales a escala bioregional. Sus miembros y colaboradores provienen de saberes diversos, cambiando la conformación del colectivo según los proyectos desarrollados. Éstos reúnen una trama compleja de intervenciones que articulan al mismo tiempo ecología, sostenibilidad, trabajos en red, producción de conocimiento, recuperación de economías locales y entramados sociales, partiendo de modelos de expansión rizomática e investigación participativa.

En su presentación Alejandro Meitin, co-fundador del colectivo, explorará una serie de iniciativas transdisciplinarias de urbanismo crítico llevadas adelante por Ala Plástica las que en su propia constitución y proceso de desarrollo integran la manera artística de pensamiento y acción a partir de la relacion entre arte y medio ambiente en el área de la cuenca del Río de la Plata e internacionalmente. Estas iniciativas comprenden estrategias dialógicas y acciones relacionadas con los contextos sociales que contrastan con las ideologías modernistas de neutralidad del arte ya que no sólo operan entre los contextos institucionales y públicos propios del mundo del arte, sino que vinculan críticamente arte y activismo, abriendo la posibilidad para que la estética trascienda sus límites disciplinarios y ámbitos operativos.

Estas referencias ayudaran a los participantes a entender cómo los artistas pueden comprometerse críticamente en los ámbitos de la producción económicay también cómo pueden participar de manera constructiva en economías basadas en la comunidad que implican trabajo artesanal, agricultura urbana, silvicultura y muchas otras actividades que hoy en día pueden beneficiarse de los conocimientos especializados y técnicas innovadoras. La presentación tratará de transmitir un enfoque holístico de los desafíos y las luchas de un mundo en constante cambio, de tal manera que los participantes puedan reconocer sus propias oportunidades y responsabilidades.

Sobre Alejandro Meitin:

Artista, abogado, y miembro fundador del colectivo artístico ambiental Ala Plástica (1991 – hasta el presente) con base en la ciudad de La Plata, Argentina. Ha participado en la investigación, elaboración y ejecución de prácticas artísticas colaborativas, trabajando en conjunto con pobladores, productores rurales, artistas, activistas, arquitectos, paisajistas, autoridades locales y expertos en control de contaminación, colaborando con entidades regionales, nacionales e internacionales a partir de propuestas bioregionales sobre ríos, sistemas y recursos acuáticos y ha realizado exhibiciones, residencias, publicaciones, dictado cursos y conferencias, en América Latina, Norte América y Europa.

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Mierle Laderman Ukeles: Maintenance Art Opening Reception

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We are incredible excited for the Opening Reception of Mierle Laderman Ukeles: Maintenance Art at Queens Museum. Over the Winter and Spring several SPQ​ MFA students worked with museum Community Engagement and Curatorial staff on Ukeles’ upcoming programming around questions of the role of artists in city agencies and sustainability, to name a few. Check out the upcoming events here.

Since the late 1960s, Mierle Laderman Ukeles’ performances, sculptural installations, and writing have explored issues profoundly important today: the role of women in society, cultures of work and labor, and the environment. Her Manifesto for Maintenance Art 1969! laid out the hidden, yet essential role of maintenance in Western society—and the radical implications of actively valuing rather than dismissing or hiding it.Join us for the opening reception for the first survey of Ukeles’ work. The show spans five decades, from Ukeles’ work as a pioneer of feminist performance to a practitioner of public art through which she invites us to reconsider indispensable urban systems and the workers who maintain them. Ukeles is undoubtedly best-known for her 38+ year role as the official, unsalaried Artist-in-Residence at New York’s Department of Sanitation. Unprecedented when it began in 1978, this residency has now become a model for municipalities engaging with artists as creative agents.

All current and former Department of Sanitation NY employees and their families admitted free throughout the run of the exhibition.

Schedule of Events

3:30pm: The day kicks off as The Social Mirror, a mirror-clad Sanitation truck, encircles the Unisphere with a procession of sanitation workers.

4pm: Touch Sanitation Performance, 1979-1980, is seen and heard anew in the Panorama of the City of New York. Join curator Larissa Harris and Ukeles as they introduce Ten Sweeps Light Path, 2016 and Trax for Trux and Barges II, 1984/2016.

5pm: Remarks by Executive Director Laura Raicovich, NYC Department of Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, and Mierle Laderman Ukeles, in the Main Atrium.

5:30pm: Join Queens Museum staff at Peace Table, 1997, to learn how to participate in upcoming dialogues on key aspects of Ukeles’ work, including artists embedded in city agencies, the future of garbage in NYC, diverse explorations on the subject of peace, human agency in changing the world, and how care and service work scales from family to city to planet.

Mierle Laderman Ukeles: Maintenance Art is organized by the Queens Museum and curated by Queens Museum Curator Larissa Harris with guest curator Patricia C. Phillips, who initiated the project in 2012.

Free shuttle service will run in a continuous loop from under the CitiField/Mets-Willets Point 7 Train Station and the Museum from 2:30-6:30pm.

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Nonfiction Workshop with Performer L.M. Bogad | Sept. 24th

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Queens Museum and Social Practice Queens (SPQ) is hosting a free hands-on Nonfiction Performance Workshop with L.M Bogad on Sat., September 24, 2016 from 2:00pm—4:00pm

All students, artists, and friends are welcome! Please let me know if you plan on attending by Thursday, September 22nd. Free but RSVP requested to preddy@queensmuseum.org

L. M. Bogad is an author, performer, and the founding Director of the Center for Tactical Performance, based in Berkeley, California. Bogad writes, performs, and strategizes with mischievous artists such as the Yes Men, Agit-Pop, and La Pocha Nostra. He is a veteran of the Lincoln Center Theatre Director’s Laboratory, and a co-founder of the Clandestine Insurgent Rebel Clown Army.

Participants must bring nonfictional texts they want to work with in performance–ideally archival government texts, but others would do.  Bring more than one document on the same topic, perhaps from different perspectives.

This is a practical performance workshop class, emphasizing the creation of original performances based on non-fictional texts.  These can range from government documents, newspaper articles, historical primary sources, eyewitness accounts, lists of chemical ingredients, instructional manuals, etc.  Students should choose a subject matter that ignites their passion/anger/sense of humor.

New Books by L.M. Bogad:

Tactical Performance: The Theory and Practice of Serious Play

Electoral Guerrilla Theatre: Radical Ridicule and Social Movements 

Cointelshow: A Patriot Act (a darkly satirical play about Cointelpro)

Food Chain

‘Dining with Vultures’ On View Until May 28th

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2016 Queens College MFA exhibition:
Dining with Vultures
May 15–28, 2016
Gallery open Thu – Sun 12 – 6pm

OPENING: Friday, May 20, 6–9pm

Sideshow Gallery
319 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn, New York

qcmfa.com
socialpracticequeens.org
www.qc.cuny.edu

Curated by Sarah Fritchey

Queens College MFA in Studio Art, City University of New York (CUNY), is pleased to announce Dining with Vultures, an ecologically-minded exhibition that contemplates art school as an ecosystem of scavenged thinking, gregarious collaboration, intergenerational slaughter and material transformation. The show features recent work of 21 emerging artists from nine countries, currently enrolled in the MFA and Social Practice Queens programs.

This exhibition is fascinated with the eating habits of urban vultures who remove death and decay from city spaces as they feast. The show highlights five behaviors characteristic of the vulture that the exhibiting artists share, including an ever-present resourcefulness, an ability to transform death into new forms, an openness to working collaboratively, a propensity to look long and work slow, and an attraction to consuming marginalized material.

In addition to works created during their time at Queens College, the artists will present new works produced specifically for the show that scavenge material from the cutting blocks, trash bins, laptops, and floors of each other’s studios. This assignment was conceived by Curator Sarah Fritchey, who will present the results as a Food Web that charts lines of production, consumption, and material concern.

Featured artists: Ghazaleh Abbasnazari, Tabitha St Cyr, Scott Braun, Nancy Bruno, Alejandro Salgado Cendales, Alix Camacho, Amy Cheng, Arber Dabaj, Eliesha Grant, Floor Grootenhuis & Setare S. Arashloo, Effisleeps, Zaid Islam, Jeff Kasper, Maria K. Karlberg-Levin, Alan Lien, Jenna Makuh, Raina Marie Panagiotopoulos, Gina Minielli, Nicole Mouriño, Uno Nam, and Erin Turner

*Image above: Alan Lien (MFA Sculpture ’16), older than Caligula but not quite there, 2016. Found hardware, cement, aluminum pipe, aluminum chain, artificial grapes, dimensions variable. Photo: Gina Minielli. Courtesy of the artist.

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Tomie Arai visits Queens College

The Queens College Department of Art welcomed Tomie Arai for a guest lecture at the Godwin Ternbach Museum Thursday, April 21st, 12 to 2pm.

Arai is public artist who lives and works in NYC. She has designed both temporary and permanent public works of art for Creative Time, the US General Services Administration Art in Architecture Program, the NYC PerCent for Art Program, the Cambridge Arts Council, the MTA Arts for Transit Program, the New York City Board of Education and the San Francisco Arts Commission. She is a 2016 A Blade of Grass Fellow for Socially-Engaged Art. About her process Arai says “Through the use of family stories, shared memories, and archival photographs, I construct pages of ‘living history’ that reflect the layered and complex narratives that give meaning to the places we live in.” Learn more about the artist here: http://tomiearai.com

Event sponsored by Professor Mitchell.
Stay-tuned for a recording of the lecture.

 

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Artist Talk with Dread Scott – March 1st, 5:00-6:30pm

The Queens Museum’s Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program and the Social Practice Queens MFA Concentration at Queens College invite you to join artist Dread Scott for a presentation and discussion of their work.

Location: Queens College, Klapper Hall, Fine Arts Department Room 672 on the 6th floor.

Campus map
Queens College shuttle bus
Directions to the Queens College campus

About Dread Scott
Dread Scott is an interdisciplinary artist whose work is exhibited across the US and internationally. For three decades he has made work that encourages viewers to re-examine cohering norms of American society. In 1989, the entire US Senate denounced and outlawed one of his artworks and President Bush declared it “disgraceful” because of its use of the American flag. His art has been exhibited/performed at MoMA/PS1, Pori Art Museum (Finland), BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) and galleries and street corners across the country. He is a recipient of grants form Creative Capital Foundation and the Pollock Krasner Foundation and his work is included in the collection of the Whitney Museum.

About Social Practice Queens
Social Practice Queens (SPQ) is a unique MFA concentration bringing together the resources of an academic research institution, Queens College (City University of New York: CUNY), with the long-standing community-based activism of the Queens Museum. The new MFA concentration in social practice integrates studio work with social, tactical, interventionist and cooperative forms. SPQ’s goal is to initiate interdisciplinary projects with real world outcomes rooted in CUNY’s rigorous departmental offerings (e.g.: urban studies, environmental science, public policy, experimental pedagogy, social theory) in tandem with the Queens Museum’s ongoing community-based activities.

About Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program
Open A.I.R. draws on the Queens Museum’s resources, staff expertise, and networks to provide workshops and lectures that help artists grow their practice, advance their career, and develop sustainable lives as artists. Given the Museum’s commitment to socially-engaged art that crosses sectors, as well as attention to its role in neighboring communities, Open A.I.R. works to expand the notion of who is an artist and, moreover, utilizes a holistic view of how to support their potential to thrive and contribute to the cultural landscape of Queens and New York City more broadly. Tailored to artists in Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island and the Bronx, Open A.I.R. prioritizes the needs of artists of color, queer artists, and immigrant artists, facilitating conversations where art meets activism, and organizing experiences that bring together artists and non-artists.

Open A.I.R. is made possible by a generous grant from The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. Additional support provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Image: On the Impossibility of Freedom in a Country Founded on Slavery and Genocide, Performance still 1, 2014. Pigment print, 22 x 30 in. Project produced by More Art.  © Dread Scott. (Photo: Mark Von Holden Photography. © Dread Scott)

Questions? Email sespinoza@queensmuseum.org

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SPQ in The New York Times! (FEB. 5, 2016)

Maureen Connor, Professor Emeritus and co-founder of the social practice program at Queens College, was featured in The New York Times, introducing SPQ and the rise of social practice and collaborative art in academic programs: “We try to teach collaboration,” … “Most artists haven’t had the opportunity to work collaboratively, and many of them find it difficult at first to work that way. For so many years, they have been encouraged to work on their own and in competition with others.”

Read more here: Social Practice Degrees Take Art to the Communal Level

Read more

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Workers Art Coalition travels to Lima Peru for Worker Education Conference

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SPQ Alumni Barrie Cline (’14) and the Workers Art Coalition (WAC) traveled to the International Federation of Workers’ Education Associations 22nd General Conference: Solidarity or Precarity? The Role of Workers Education in building the 21st Century global labor movement.

They recieved a grant the Van Arsdale Center and presentated on WAC projects to date proposing collaboration workers public art project in concert with the International Labor Organizations centennial in 2019.  Plumbers built a preliminary pvc structure which Jaime Lopez customized and lit up for the purposes of framing a street theatre project that Namrata Bali of the Self Employed Women’s Association in India, collaboratively created with conference participants from all over the world. Stay tuned for updates on future collaborations.

more about Workers Art Coalition.

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Sol Aramendi (’14) is Collaborating with Day Laborers to Create a Wage Theft App!

Sol Aramendi, 2015 A Blade of Grass Fellow, and SPQ alumni, is developing a “Wage Theft app” as a result of a joint effort between artists, day laborers, community organizers and lawyers.

The Spanish-language platform for Android and iPhones came to be after five sessions in which day laborers gave ideas for a digital resource that would accommodate their needs. The app, which will cost $10,000 to design, will be developed by Cornell University and should be out in September.

Read more here.

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SPQ Alum José Serrano-McClain Teaching Social Practice at Moore College & NYU

José Serrano-McClain (SPQ ’15) is now an Adjunct Professor at the New York University, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development in the Department of Art and Art Professions teaching a course titled ‘Contemporary Art and Community Partnerships’, one of 3 core courses for the new MA in Art, Education, and Community Practice. In addition Serrano-McClain is teaching in the new MFA in Community Practice at Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia.

Learn more about the artist and community organizer here.

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Welcome Dr. Veronica Tello

SPQ is excited to have Dr. Tello visit SPQ this fall!  She is the Vice-Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellow National Institute for Experimental Arts, at UNSW AUSTRALIA.

Veronica Tello completed her PhD at the University of Melbourne in 2013. Her research broadly focuses on the intersections of contemporary art and politics. Her forthcoming book Counter-Memorial Aesthetics: Contemporary Art and Refugee Histories (Radical Aesthetics Radical Art series, Bloomsbury) analyses how contemporary artists have adopted experimental methods for memorialising recent refugee flows spanning Cuba–America, Middle-East–Australia and Africa–Europe.

Her current research examines contemporary art at the intersection of social practice, public art and institutional critique in the work of artists such as Tania Bruguera, Ahmet Ögüt, Renzo Martens and Jonas Staal. It traces the development of experimenal social institutions led by these artists in diverse regions including the Congo, Syria, Germany and the US amidst global crises including conflict, refugee flows and the uneven distribution of capital.

Veronica’s work has been widely published in national and international journals, most recently in Third Text, Afterall and Contemporaneity. Other publications include essays in Phaidon’s Vitamin D2 and Vitamin P2 monographs, as well as catalogue essays for numerous Australian artists in the areas of performance art, video art, photography and installation

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Welcome Tanex López!

This November, SPQ welcomes visiting student Tanex López! López is a visual artist and founding member of “La Agencia”: a civil association interested in the connection between contemporary art, education and social practice. He is currently studying a Master Program at Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Mexico. His ongoing research examines art educators’ belief system in order to understand the pedagogical practices of art teaching both local and globally.

Tanex’s work with “La Agencia” includes pedagogical interventions such as workshops of contemporary art or deschooling courses for high school students. In 2012, he received a State award for a project called Historia reciente del Arte en Aguascalientes. The work consisted in the creation of an archive containing information about the recent history of the visual arts in the city.

Check out his work here:

http://agenciaorg.blogspot.mx/p/portafilio.html

http://archivocolectivo.blogspot.mx/

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Artist Caroline Woolard Visits SPQ – December 8th 5PM

The Queens Museum’s Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program and the Social Practice Queens MFA Concentration at Queens College invite you to join artist Caroline Woolard for a presentation and discussion of their work.

Location: Queens College, Klapper Hall, Fine Arts Department Room 672 on the 6th floor.

Campus map
Queens College shuttle bus
Directions to the Queens College campus

About Caroline Woolard

Caroline Woolard is an artist and organizer whose interdisciplinary work facilitates social imagination at the intersection of art, urbanism, architecture, and political economy. After co-founding and co-directing resource sharing networks OurGoods.org and TradeSchool.coop from 2008-2014, Woolard is now focused on her work with BFAMFAPhD.com to raise awareness about the impact of rent, debt, and precarity on culture and on the NYC Real Estate Investment Cooperative to create and support truly affordable commercial space for cultural resilience and economic justice in New York City.

Caroline Woolard’s work has been supported by MoMA, the Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund, Eyebeam, the MacDowell Colony, unemployment benefits, the curiosity of strangers, and many collaborators. Recent group exhibitions include: Crossing Brooklyn, The Brooklyn Museum, New York, NY; Maker Biennial, The Museum of Art and Design, New York, NY; and Artist as Social Agent, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH. Woolard’s work will be featured in Art21’s New York Close Up documentary series over the next three years. Woolard is a lecturer at the School of Visual Arts and the New School, is an Artist in Residence at the Queens Museum of Art, and was just named the 2015 Arts and Social Justice Fellow at the Judson Church.

About Social Practice Queens
Social Practice Queens (SPQ) is a unique MFA concentration bringing together the resources of an academic research institution, Queens College (City University of New York: CUNY), with the long-standing community-based activism of the Queens Museum. The new MFA concentration in social practice integrates studio work with social, tactical, interventionist and cooperative forms. SPQ’s goal is to initiate interdisciplinary projects with real world outcomes rooted in CUNY’s rigorous departmental offerings (e.g.: urban studies, environmental science, public policy, experimental pedagogy, social theory) in tandem with the Queens Museum’s ongoing community-based activities.

About Open A.I.R. Artist Services Program
Open A.I.R. draws on the Queens Museum’s resources, staff expertise, and networks to provide workshops and lectures that help artists grow their practice, advance their career, and develop sustainable lives as artists. Given the Museum’s commitment to socially-engaged art that crosses sectors, as well as attention to its role in neighboring communities, Open A.I.R. works to expand the notion of who is an artist and, moreover, utilizes a holistic view of how to support their potential to thrive and contribute to the cultural landscape of Queens and New York City more broadly. Tailored to artists in Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island and the Bronx, Open A.I.R. prioritizes the needs of artists of color, queer artists, and immigrant artists, facilitating conversations where art meets activism, and organizing experiences that bring together artists and non-artists. These goals are addressed through the following vehicles:

Open A.I.R. is made possible by a generous grant from The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. Additional support provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Image: Caroline Woolard by Avia Moore

Questions? Email sespinoza@queensmuseum.org

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SPQ’s Greg Sholette at 2015 Creative Time Summit: “The Curriculum NYC”

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2015 Creative Time Summit: “The Curriculum NYC”

November 14–15, 2015 | Register here

Boys and Girls High School
1700 Fulton Street
Brooklyn, NY 11213
After two years, the Creative Time Summit—the world’s largest international conference on art and social change—is headed home to New York City! Creative Time Summit: “The Curriculum NYC” will take place at the Boys and Girls High School in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn on November 14 and 15, 2015.

Building on the Summit held at the Venice Biennale in August, the New York Summit is dedicated to education and other ways knowledge is disseminated and obtained. “The Curriculum NYC” will focus on the effects of specific education policies in the United States. From within Boys and Girls High School, which has come to symbolize both the democratic ambitions and the pervasive inequalities of public education today, we will explore the relationship between knowledge and geopolitics, pedagogical art practices, omissions in contemporary curricula, and political issues such as the re-segregation of public schools and student debt.

In addition to hosting presentations by a distinguished roster of over 50 participants, the Creative Time Summit: “The Curriculum NYC” invites attendees to join in our afternoon sessions, which will comprise break-out sessions held in the school’s classrooms. Taking the form of roundtables, open dialogs, or workshops, they will provide opportunities for more intimate exchanges among attendees, special guests, Summit presenters, and students or teachers from Boys and Girls High School. While diving deeper into urgent pedagogical issues, sessions will also address topics specific to the field of socially engaged art.

Keynote addresses will be given by investigative journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones and artist/community activist Boots Riley. Participants include Bill Ayers, Luis Camnitzer, Hope Ginsburg, Gugulective (Athi Mongezeleli Joja), Hans Haacke, Tia Powell Harris, Kemi Ilesanmi, Rolling Jubilee (Laura Hanna and Astra Taylor), Stanley Kinard, Pedro Lasch, Simone Leigh, MFA NO MFA (ex-USC students), Naeem Mohaiemen, Pepón Osorio, Jolene Rickard, Andrew Ross, and Jennifer Scott.

Workshops, roundtables and panels to be led by the Center for Artistic Activism, Flux Factory, Deborah Fisher, Noah Fischer, Not an Alternative, Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz, Douglas Paulson, Laundromat Project, Marinella Senatore, Visible Project, Gregory Sholette, Daniel Tucker, Caroline Woolard and Sue Bell Yank. In addition, there will be a featured special project by Chto Delat.

Get your tickets for “The Curriculum NYC” today! Pay-what-you-wish tickets available here.
Special opening event by The Visible Project
On the High Line at West 16th Street
Friday, November 13, 6pm

Creative Time Summit: The Curriculum NYC kicks off with an opening event co-presented with High Line Art. Curated by Matteo Lucchetti and Judith Wielander of the Visible Project, the event will include site-specific performances by Marinella Senatore, Nástio Mosquito, and others to be announced. Performances are free and open to the public.

Call for proposals
Are you an artist, activist or cultural producer living and/or working in the neighborhoods of Bed-Stuy or Crown Heights? Interested in organizing and leading a roundtable discussion focused on important issues in your community? Click here for more information on how to get involved.

 

For more information and summit updates, visit us at creativetime.org/summit.

 

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Gulf Labor, Precarious Workers Rights, and SPQ at The CUNY Graduate Center

Gulf Labor, Precarious Workers Rights, and SPQ at The CUNY Graduate Center
Join SPQ and QCMFA’s own Gregory Sholette, Setare Arashloo, and Barrie Cline (’14) for a conversation on Nov 19, 2015, 6:30 pm at the Skylight Room 9100, CUNY Graduate Center,365 Fifth Avenue, New York.
Precarious Workers Pageant, Venice Italy 8/7/2015

What does Bertolt Brecht have to do with workers’ rights in Abu Dhabi? Although politically engaged art and theater takes many forms, the recent Precarious Workers Pageant at the Venice Biennale took a Brechtian approach as it pointed out the solidification of global capital in architecture in Abu Dhabi and the precarious state of migrant workers who are building these future cultural sites. The pageant’s street performance offered a new public commons fabricated out of the deconstructed architecture of the avant-garde museum. Join artists, scholars, and activists in conversation for an evening of discussion, debate, and for an evening of discussion, debate, and propositions as part of the Social Choreography seminar at the Center for the Humanities and in tandem with the exhibition by Zoe Beloff at the James Gallery, “A World Redrawn: Eisenstein and Brecht in Hollywood.” Following the Precarious Workers Pageant video premier will be another New York premier: a presentation of The Gulf: High Culture/Hard Labor, edited by A. Ross and published by OR Books, with contributions by Sholette and other members of Gulf Labor.

Read more about the Precarious Workers Pageant on a-n Artists Information Company, Hyperallergic, tumblr, and Gregory Sholette’s blog.

The event is co-sponsored by the Social Choreography Mellon Seminar in Public Engagement and Collaborative Research in the Humanities, Center for Place, Culture and Politics, and Committee on Globalization and Social Change.

 

- See more at: http://www.centerforthehumanities.org/program/gulf-labor-and-precarious-workers-rights#sthash.IkYj7MPT.dpuf

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Gregory Sholette at UChicago | October 9th

Gregory Sholette: Precarious Workers of the (Art) World Unite!

Friday, October 9
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Cochrane-Woods Art Center, Room 157
5540 South Greenwood Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637

Gregory Sholette, artist, writer, activist, and professor of Sculpture and social practice at Queens College, discusses the varied tactics associated with Gulf Labor Coalition as they seek to call attention to the plight of precarious migrant workers in Abu Dhabi where a new Guggenheim Museum is in the works, followed by an examination of Marina Naprushkina’s sustainable art project in the Moabit section of Berlin where she is developing an “artificial institution” whose mission is to service the needs of her “new neighbors”: political refugees fleeing military and economic conflict in Syria, Iraq and Northern Africa. The broader issue that both of these politically engaged, artistic endeavors confronts is how we might redirect resources, as well as invent new models, for rethinking the notion of a shared commons operating in opposition to the predacious appetite of neoliberal enterprise culture. This larger agenda seems especially urgent today as we witness an ever-tightening intersection between contemporary art, global capital, and the growing multitude of migratory, precarious, and paperless laborers who are simultaneously tasked with building the fabulous architectural fantasies serving the world’s .01% ultra-rich, while also demonized as a dangerous social surplus dragging down limited economic resources. People at risk, including refugees, low-income workers, indebted students, marginalized people of color and women, as well as most artists, and even perhaps an entire nation in the case of Greece, increasingly wield a dark transformative agency with nothing to lose except their precariousness.

Presented by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society, Critical Inquiry, Art History, DOVA, and Art and Public Life.